Nature Moncton Information Line: Oct 6 2022 | Nature Updates

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

Oct 6, 2022 (Thursday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier [email protected]

**Several caterpillar species are on the move right now and will be soon going into their pupal cocoon for the winter with a few nice photos for today’s edition.

Bev Schneider got a photo of the Galium Sphinx AKA Bedstraw Hawk-moth caterpillar, They do tend to be variable in color pattern and Bev’s photo shows it as brown whereas one submitted earlier by Sue Berube was quite dark.

When these caterpillars are found at this time of year, they can be put in an aquarium style container with several inches of earth, and they will soon form a cocoon under the earth surface which will emerge as the beautiful Bedstraw Hawk-moth next spring ( if not parasitized). It should be kept in an unheated area overwinter with the ground damp but not saturated.

**Fred and Sue Richards also recently came across one of the large sphinx moth caterpillars, the beautiful Laurel Sphinx roaming about their Taylor Village yard.

They also noted 2 bird’s nests that were blown out of a tree across the road from them by Hurricane Fiona. Fortunately, our hurricanes often arrive in the fall after the nests have successfully fledged their broods.

They also got a photo of a Spring Peeper firmly attached to the siding of their home with the clearly visible sucker toe pads. It is not unusual to hear the call of a single Spring Peeper in a tree this time of year to sometimes frustrate birdwatchers until familiar with the sound of a lone individual.

Fred and Sue knew that a Pileated Woodpecker was around but had not seen it near the house before. She flew into the yard and seemed unconcerned about the people there. Sue had time to get the camera and take several photos while she went from tree to tree. She seemed to like the stump.

**Shannon Inman got photos of a very active Garter Snake about 18 to 20 inches long after which she directed it off the roadway out of harm’s way.

John Inman was able to get a photo of an adult White-crowned Sparrow that visited their Harvey, Albert County yard. This sparrow is stopping off at feeder yards to fuel up on its migratory route from breeding grounds to the north of us to southerly wintering grounds, making the time window to see them relatively short. (Editor’s note: I am reattaching a photo of a young-of-the-year White-crowned Sparrow that Aldo Dorio photographed a few days ago to note the juvenile plumage of this sparrow).

**Aldo Dorio got a pleasant photo of a loan Horned Lark at Hay Island on Wednesday. No doubt it will soon be joined by more.

**Lisa Morris photographed one of our many species of Ichneumon Wasps, Lisa’s specimen shows the white sections in its long antennae.

Lisa also photographed the lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata, commonly known as the Spotted Lady Beetle, Pink Spotted Lady Beetle or Twelve-Spotted Lady Beetlewhich is a large lady beetle native to North America, The adults and larvae feed primarily on aphids and the species has been used as a biological control agent. (Editor’s note: BugGuide identified this lady beetle and literature suggests it to be native to North America. I do not recall encountering this lady beetle personally and am not sure of its status in New Brunswick at the time of publishing this edition of Nature News. Comments are welcomed). Detailed information is available at the link below.

https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Coleomegilla_maculata/

**Nelson Poirier would like to boast about the awesome strategy of his
pseudo-duck hunting dog Sadie, She came across a flock of Mallard Ducks on land beside the river, but they would have nothing to do with her getting near when they were on land and flew to the water for safety. Sadie decided it would be an idea to slowly slip into the water and befriend them to get their confidence and let them know that she was not a danger. It all worked out well until she got within a few feet of them when they suddenly burst in flight and Sadie was left alone without her duck reward. The ducks permitted no second opportunistic chances!

The photo says it all.

[email protected]

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

HORNED LARK. OCT 5, 2022. ALDO DORIO

PILEATED WOODPECKER (FEMALE). OCT. 4, 2022. SUSAN RICHARDS

WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW (ADULT). OCT 5, 2022. JOHN INMAN

WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW (JUVENILE). OCT 1, 2022. ALDO DORIO

WHITE-THROATED SPARROW. OCT 4, 2022. ALDO DORIO

LAUREL SPHINX MOTH CATERPILLAR. SEPT. 26, 2022. FRED RICHARDS

GALIUM SPHINX MOTH AKA BEDSTRAW HAWK-MOTH CATERPILLAR. OCT 5, 2022. BEV SCHNEIDER

SPOTTED PINK LADY BEETLE. OCT 4, 2022. ,LISA MORRIS

SPOTTED PINK LADY BEETLE. OCT 4, 2022. ,LISA MORRIS

ICHNEUMON WASP. OCT 4, 2022. LISA MORRIS

SPRING PEEPER. SEPT. 28, 2022 SUSAN RICHARDS

GARTER SNAKE. OCT 5, 2022. SHANNON INMAN

GARTER SNAKE. OCT 5, 2022. SHANNON INMAN

DUCK TACTICS WITH SADIE. OCT 5, 2022, FRED DUBE

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